NUTRITION IN PREGNANCY

Nutrition Kenya

NUTRITION IN PREGNANCY

Did know that pregnancy and breastfeeding are the most nutritionally demanding times of a woman’s life? There is never a better time to start improving your eating habits than when you are planning to get pregnant, are pregnant or lactating. The body needs enough nutrients every day to support the growth of the baby, maintenance of mother’s body and replenish mother’s decreased stores. Women must lead a healthy lifestyle even before becoming pregnant. This includes being active and maintaining, or working towards a healthy weight

Yes good nutrition is important for you and your baby even before conception all the nourishment the developing baby needs comes from the mother either through the diet or the mothers stores so as to build your essential nutrients stores you need a healthy diet way before pregnancy. Each day, try to include a wide variety of foods from each of the food five food groups. What are some of the frequently asked about nutrition and health before, during and after pregnancy?

How important is what I eat?

Healthy living through diet and exercise is important throughout the lifecycle. Mothers must aim to lead a healthy lifestyle way before becoming pregnant. This includes being active and maintaining or working towards a healthy weight. It is best that you have a healthy, nutritious diet before becoming pregnant. This will help your nutrient stores to be ‘topped up’. You should try to include a wide variety of food from each of the food five food groups daily.

What are some of the essential nutrients during pregnancy and why?

Nutrient requirement increase before during and after pregnancy Calcium, iron, protein and folate are examples of nutrients which are extra important during pregnancy. In this article we will look at Folate.
Folate is one of the vitamins needed by everyone for good health. It is required to build protein tissues. Low folate levels are linked to birth defects such as spina bifida. These defects form early in pregnancy, often before women know they are pregnant. This is why it is important to eat enough foods high in folate like broccoli, dark green vegetables, and oranges both before and during pregnancy.
It has been shown that extra folate in the very early stages of pregnancy can reduce the chance of having a baby with a neural tube defect. Spina bifida is the most common neural tube defect. This defect occurs when the spinal cord and brain are forming. This can happen before you know you are pregnant
Although it is worthwhile increasing the folate in your diet, the best way to guarantee you get enough is to ‘top up’ with a folate tablet. You can do this by taking folate (folic acid) tablet, for at least ONE MONTH BEFORE pregnancy and the FIRST THREE MONTHS of pregnancy. Some women may be at a higher risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect and will be recommended a higher dose of folate.

How much food do I need to eat?

When you are pregnant you do not need to ‘eat for two’! The quality of your diet is much more important than the quantity of food that you eat. In fact, when you are pregnant your need for energy is only slightly higher than normal. Calcium, iron, protein and folate are examples of nutrients which are extra important during pregnancy.

How much weight should I gain?

It may be harder to get pregnant if you are very underweight or overweight. Discuss this with your doctor, dietician/nutritionist and midwife. If you are overweight, pregnancy is not a safe time for trying to lose weight. Tackle this either before the pregnancy or as a long term goal after your baby is born.

Weight gain iNUTRITION IN PREGNANCY

Did know that pregnancy and breastfeeding are the most nutritionally demanding times of a woman’s life? There is never a better time to start improving your eating habits than when you are planning to get pregnant, are pregnant or lactating. The body needs enough nutrients every day to support the growth of the baby, maintenance of mother’s body and replenish mother’s decreased stores. Women must lead a healthy lifestyle even before becoming pregnant. This includes being active and maintaining, or working towards a healthy weight

Yes good nutrition is important for you and your baby even before conception all the nourishment the developing baby needs comes from the mother either through the diet or the mothers stores so as to build your essential nutrients stores you need a healthy diet way before pregnancy. Each day, try to include a wide variety of foods from each of the food five food groups. What are some of the frequently asked about nutrition and health before, during and after pregnancy?

How important is what I eat?

Healthy living through diet and exercise is important throughout the lifecycle. Mothers must aim to lead a healthy lifestyle way before becoming pregnant. This includes being active and maintaining or working towards a healthy weight. It is best that you have a healthy, nutritious diet before becoming pregnant. This will help your nutrient stores to be ‘topped up’. You should try to include a wide variety of food from each of the food five food groups daily.

What are some of the essential nutrients during pregnancy and why?

Nutrient requirement increase before during and after pregnancy Calcium, iron, protein and folate are examples of nutrients which are extra important during pregnancy. In this article we will look at Folate.
Folate is one of the vitamins needed by everyone for good health. It is required to build protein tissues. Low folate levels are linked to birth defects such as spina bifida. These defects form early in pregnancy, often before women know they are pregnant. This is why it is important to eat enough foods high in folate like broccoli, dark green vegetables, and oranges both before and during pregnancy.
It has been shown that extra folate in the very early stages of pregnancy can reduce the chance of having a baby with a neural tube defect. Spina bifida is the most common neural tube defect. This defect occurs when the spinal cord and brain are forming. This can happen before you know you are pregnant
Although it is worthwhile increasing the folate in your diet, the best way to guarantee you get enough is to ‘top up’ with a folate tablet. You can do this by taking folate (folic acid) tablet, for at least ONE MONTH BEFORE pregnancy and the FIRST THREE MONTHS of pregnancy. Some women may be at a higher risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect and will be recommended a higher dose of folate.

How much food do I need to eat?

When you are pregnant you do not need to ‘eat for two’! The quality of your diet is much more important than the quantity of food that you eat. In fact, when you are pregnant your need for energy is only slightly higher than normal. Calcium, iron, protein and folate are examples of nutrients which are extra important during pregnancy.

How much weight should I gain?

It may be harder to get pregnant if you are very underweight or overweight. Discuss this with your doctor, dietician/nutritionist and midwife. If you are overweight, pregnancy is not a safe time for trying to lose weight. Tackle this either before the pregnancy or as a long term goal after your baby is born.

Weight gain is a normal part of a healthy pregnancy. How much weight you gain depends on several things, including your pre-pregnancy weight. Most women expect to gain between . Those who start under-weight may gain more while that over-weight may gain
Less

The weight you gain is made up of extra body tissue, placenta, fluid, blood as well as your developing baby. Remember that weight gain is part of a healthy pregnancy so don’t over restrict it. If your weight gain is in the healthy range you can expect to return to your pre-pregnancy weight after your baby is born. Breastfeeding helps you lose weight

s a normal part of a healthy pregnancy. How much weight you gain depends on several things, including your pre-pregnancy weight. Most women expect to gain between . Those who start under-weight may gain more while that over-weight may gain
Less

The weight you gain is made up of extra body tissue, placenta, fluid, blood as well as your developing baby. Remember that weight gain is part of a healthy pregnancy so don’t over restrict it. If your weight gain is in the healthy range you can expect to return to your pre-pregnancy weight after your baby is born. Breastfeeding helps you lose weight

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